Refine Your Search

Alaska USA 1930 stock footage and images

- Showing 1 to 6 of 24468 results
 
Career of U.S. Air Force General Hap Arnold. The 1930s.

New B-10 bombers taxi and take off. Under command of Lieutenant Colonel Henry (Hap) Arnold, a contingent of B-10s undertakes a long range mission from Washington, DC, to Fairbanks, Alaska. Aircraft and crews seen in heavy snow and cold in Alaska. Upon return to Washington, Arnold receives the MacKay trophy.

Date: 1934
Duration: 45 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Information about unidentified airplanes is transmitted in the United States.

A public television program by the U.S. Army entitled 'The Big Picture.' U.S. troops are seen hunkered down and looking through binoculars in a defensive position in Korea, during the Korean War. American soldiers riding atop a Sherman tank on a city street in Germany, during World War II. Ski troops moving across snowy hill in Alaska. U.S. Army amphibious assault training on a beach in Puerto Rico. Army Master Sergeant Stuart Queen, narrator, speaks about America's defense against threat of atomic attack in these times of lukewarm peace. View of mountainous region in Alaska. A cluster of Cup'it Eskimo dwellings is seen on Nunivak Island, in the Bering Sea. Several of the local inhabitants are fishing through holes cut in the ice. Vapor trails are seen from Soviet aircraft flying at high altitude. A sign on a tarpaulin displaying logo of the Army Signal Corps, reads,"Alaska Communication System, Long Distance Commercial Telephone-Telegraph." A tracked vehicle carries a soldier to a facility posting a sign reading, "Alaska Communications System Receiver Station." Several tall antennas loom above the site. The soldier, dressed in arctic gear, steps from the tracked vehicle and walks past several snow shoes, standing upright in the snow, to enter a white wooden building. Inside, a man in civilian clothes works at a battery of telecomunications equipment. He transmits a message about the aircraft sighting, to the Alaska Communication System facility in Fairbanks Alaska (briefly shown) by means of a telegraph key. From there it is relayed to a Signal Corps facility, shown, in Washington, DC. A soldier is seen Inside that facility, in a room filled with computers and telecommunications equipment. A Sergeant handles paper tape messages being sent ant received by teletype. Another soldier plugs connections into a communications switchboard. Next, the camera pans over the entrance to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, in the Pentagon. More views of soldiers attending banks of teletype machines. Animated map displays paths of orders being transmitted to U.S. Air Defense Centers in San Francisco, Chicago, Seattle, New York, and Atlanta. View from control room, of several U.S. Air Force F-94 Fighter Interceptor aircraft on an airfield ramp. A controller activates a Klaxon horn and pilots on alert, in the Fighter Interceptor Squadron ready room, jump up and scramble to their aircraft. A pair of F-94s taking off. One is number 51-5385. Next, a U.S. Navy F-9 fighter plane is seen taking off from an airfield. It displays tail code AE. It is followed by another F-9 aircraft.

Date: 1954
Duration: 3 min 39 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Labor Union movement grows significantly, but labor strife also continues during 1930s in the U.S.A.

Men work assembling transmissions on an automobile production line. John L. Lewis, President of the United Mine Workers Union, giving a speech supporting formation of the Congress of Industrial organizations (CIO). Group of workers gather to listen to a union speaker. Many wear miners hats. Cheering Union workers march in street carrying posters reading: "Long-Live the C.I.O." and "Forward eith C.I.O." Leaders of the early C.I.O., Sidney Hillman,President of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA); Philip Murray, Vice President of the C.I.O.; and John L. Lewis, C.I.O. President, circa 1938. David Dubinsky, President of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU); along with Sidney Hillman, and John L. Lewis, are seen mingling with clothing workers. View of a steel mill from workers' residential street on a snowy day. Steel worker in a mill. Deckhand and an engine man aboard a merchant ship. Roustabouts and riggers at an oil well. Nonferris metal miner in rail car. Worker in tire factory. Electrical worker. Union leader speaking to group of workers carrying banner reading: "Shirt workers, Local 128 Allentown, Pennsylvania Joint Board." Labor organizers passing out leaflets to workers leaving a factory. Labor discussions with workers at lunch tables. Draftsman preparing labor organization signs calling for "Sanitary Conditions" and "Fair Play." Working women singing a union song. Union workers marching and carrying signs for various causes. Man riding a bicycle displaying sign:"Don't Scab." Car overloaded with people with sign: "Come To Lafollette Labor Rally Monday, July 5, 1937." ACWA workers of Local 95, Atlas Plant. UMWA members of Lafollette, Tennessee. Miners playing cards and playing musical instruments. Miners on strike below in mine for 5 days, cheer leader. Poster encouraging Americans to travel and visit in the USA. Police injure several persons during labor protests in San Francisco. U.S. Army soldiers arresting a civilian and throwing tear gas grenades.

Date: 1938
Duration: 4 min 13 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Fur seals are selected, killed and skinned by a group of American men at the Pribilof Islands in Alaska.

Fur seals on the Pribilof Islands in Alaska are selected, killed and skinned. Names of fur companies like Northwest Company, Hudson Bay Company, Astor, Rocky Mountain Fur Company written on hands. A large number of fur seals on the Pribilof Islands. Alaskan fur seals huddled together in a large group. A group of men skinning fur seals. The surviving seals get into ocean.

Date: 1930
Duration: 2 min 35 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
The U.S. Army Air Corps Alaska Flight of 1934, reaches Fairbanks, Alaska 5 days after leaving Washington, DC.

The U.S. Army Air Corps Alaska expedition flight of 1934. YB-10 aircraft of the Alaska Flight are parked at an airport in Fairbanks, Alaska. Hangars are seen in background. One of the aircraft is starting its right engine. Camera pans the grass field where YB-10 are parked (and a dog stands in the center of the field). The Pan American Airways logo is painted on front of a hangar and "Pacific Alaska Airways" below it. A wind sock is atop the hangar. Scene shifts to Lieutenant Colonel Henry "Hap" Arnold, standing with his aviators in front of a YB-10 airplane. He is receiving a large symbolic "Key to the City," from Fairbanks Mayor, Ernest B. Collins. They shake hands, and Mayor Collins takes his hat off to Colonel Arnold and his fliers. Arnold and Collins pose for a closeup. Camera pans across the Alaska Flight airplanes parked on the field

Date: 1934, July 24
Duration: 2 min 23 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
YB-10s of the U.S. Army Air Corps 1934 Alaska Flight return to Bolling Field in Washington, DC after flying more than 7000 miles.

The U.S. Army Air Corps (USAAC) Alaska Flight of 1934 departing Fairbanks Alaska on flight back to Washington, DC. Their YB-10 aircraft are seen in a line on the airfield. Spectators are at the edge of the field to see them off. Next, the aircraft are seen taxiing out for takeoff, with their Commander, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Arnold, piloting the lead aircraft, the "City of Fairbanks." Other aircraft follow in succession. Colonel Arnold's airplane takes off and proceeds in a shallow climb. Slate tells first leg is 640 miles to Juneau in 3 hours and 55 minutes. Map shows North America with outbound course to Alaska from Washington, DC, traversing the Great Lakes, Edmonton, Prince George, and White Horse, to Fairbanks. But a moving arrow shows return route via Juneau. Snow-covered mountains seen from a YB-10 on this return leg. Aerial shots of several YB-10s in formation. Slate announces next leg as 940 miles and 5 hours and 40 minutes to Seattle, Washington State. Aircraft and crews of the returning Alaska Flight, seen on a grass field in Seattle. Lieutenant Colonel Henry Arnold, expedition commander, leads his fliers across the field. Slate states remaining distance to Washington, DC, as 2700 miles and 14 hours. More shots of YB-10s in formation aloft. Shot of a YB-10 with farmland below. Ten YB-10s seen in formation, and the animated map completes the journey to Washington, DC. Aerial view from above of several YB-10s below, flying over the Potomac River, in Washington, DC, with the Lincoln Memorial, and Arlington Memorial bridge visible below. The formation of 10 planes barely visible above the Capitol building. The YB-10 named Juneau, taxiing across Bolling Field, after landing. (This segment of film is reversed, so the name and Alaska Flight logo are mirror-reversed.) The last of the 10 aircraft pulls into position on the flightline. Lieutenant Colonel Henry (Hap) Arnold stands in front of his fliers who hold a large totem pole souvenir. Secretary of War, George H. Dern, greets the returning aviators and poses next to Colonel Arnold.

Date: 1934, August 20
Duration: 3 min 44 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
<< Previous | Page:1 2 3 ... 4078 | Next >>