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Atlantic Ocean 1918 stock footage and images

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Charles Lindbergh takes off from Roosevelt Field for his famous solo flight from New York to Paris.

People gathered early on a misty morning at Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, to watch as Charles Lindbergh attempts to make a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in his airplane, The Spirit of St. Louis. The plane starts its takeoff role between groups of spectators, raising dust. The spectators move to get a better view as the plane continues, out of sight in the fog and mist. It is not clear where the plane is, although engine sound has changed. Spectators strain to see it through the mist. Then, some cheers are raised when the crowd realizes that Lindbergh has successfully taken off in his heavily laden airplane. The opening caption refers to Curtiss Field, where the Spirit of St. Louis was test flown and reportedly maintained in Hanger 16. there, from May 12th through the 20th. However, for the Paris flight, the plane was towed a mile to Roosevelt Field where, heavily loaded with fuel, it could take advantage of the longer runway for takeoff. (Note: Both fields were originally part of the old Hempstead Plains Field renamed Hazlehurst Field when taken over by the U.S. Army in 1917. U.S. Geological survey maps of 1918 show three areas named, respectively, Hazelhurst Aviation Field No. 1; Aviation Field No. 2; and Camp Albert L. Mills, abutting it. Field No. 2 was renamed Mitchel Field on July 16, 1918. The eastern part of Field No. 1 was dedicated as Roosevelt Field, on September 24, 1918. After the war, the western part of Field No. 1 became known as Curtiss Field, associated, as it was, with the Curtiss Aeroplane & Motor Company located there.)

Date: 1927, May 20
Duration: 2 min 4 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
USS Tennessee sails under Brooklyn Bridge in June 1920. Also seen: December 1918 Naval Review and Presidential Yacht, Mayflower

U.S. battleship, USS Tennessee, sails up East River to Brooklyn Naval Yard. Next scene shows her heading back out to sea for maneuvers with a fleet in the Atlantic Ocean. in both, the Tennessee sails under the Brooklyn Bridge. Woolworth Building in Manhattan visible. A tugboat follows.View,upward, to roadbed of the Brooklyn Bridge, from vessel passing underneath. Crew members aboard the ship look at the skyline of New York City. A large boat filled with sightseers passes on the river. A group of U.S. Navy officers poses near a gun turret of the ship. A group of sailors sits under a three-gun turret aboard the ship. Commercial vessels moving in the river. Sailors at railing, look at skyline of Manhattan, New York City, as the ship passes on the East River. Ferry boats pass. View of the Statue of Liberty, in mist, framed above, by three of the Ship's 14 inch guns. Two Admirals and the USS Tennessee's officers, pose on deck, under two turrets with three 14 inch guns, in each. Sailors of the crew pose on deck of the battleship. A different time: December 25, 1918, Crewman in foul weather gear stands at railing of official Photographers boat, with battleships in background, during the great Naval review. A motor launch flying a two-star admiral's ensign, passes at high speed, with the Presidential Yacht, Mayflower, in background. The launch circles and reverses course.

Date: 1920, June
Duration: 3 min 34 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: None
 
 
A mix of submarines from World War I to 1925

Sequence 1; The launching of the USS V-1 (later Barracuda SS-163) on July 17, 1924 from the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. Sequence 2; Two surrendered German U-Boats, most likely the U-117 (L) and the UB-148 (R) circa 1918/19. Sequence 3; The USS S-19 circa 1925 either looking to moor or pulling away to sea. Sequence 4; U.S. "L" class submarines ay Bantry Bay, Queenstown, Ireland circa 1918 World War 1, American submarines had to place an "A" before there name to avoid confusion with the British "L" class submarines. L to R are L-11 (bow), L-1, L-10, L-4 and L-9.

Date: 1918
Duration: 1 min 28 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: None
 
 
U.S. Navy troop transport operations in New York and New Jersey in World War I

The SS Leviathan, the largest ocean liner afloat, (former German ocean liner Vaterland, seized and renamed by the U.S. Government in 1917, as America entered World War 1). Tug boats assist the three-stacker Leviathan as she enters New York harbor. Tug boats working with another troop ship (two-stacker) in the harbor. Ferry boat in background. A sleek troop transport ship with two slanted stacks and rakish lines, accentuated by camouflage, in a New Jersey harbor.Two Navy troop ships underway with an airplane flying overhead. A column of U.S. Navy troop transport ships underway in the Atlantic ocean. A barrage balloon is seen overhead.

Date: 1918
Duration: 2 min 17 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Montage of scenes involving U.S. Battleships in the World War I era

First scene shows foredeck and bridge of USS New York (BB-34) in World War 1. Second scene shows U.S. New Mexico-class Battleship underway. In the next scene, a sailor is signaling with a blinker from the bridge of a battleship ( Pennsylvania or New Mexico). Line of battleships in formation with the USS Texas (BB-35) leading. Quarterdeck view of U.S. Navy Pennsylvania-class battleship. View from deck of the battleship USS Texas or USS New York, looking forward. The final scene is a view from the quarterdeck of the battleship USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) looking out toward the SS George Washington (ID Number 3018) as they travel to France with President Woodrow Wilson on board in December 1918, for the Paris Peace Conference.

Date: 1918
Duration: 2 min 25 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: None
 
 
Headquarters of the Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic (SACLANT) in Norfolk, Virginia. Canadian Naval Base, Halifax ,NS

Responsibilities and assets of NATO's SACLANT. View from cockpit of aircraft landing on deck of U.S. aircraft carrier USS Bennington (CVA-20). Scenes of Atlantic ocean. Periscope of submarine breaks surface. View through periscope. American convoy underway during WWII in the Atlantic Ocean. Enemy submarine launches torpedo. Ships being struck by torpedoes. Underwater view of submarine. A torpedoed ship sinking. Views of empty Nazi submarine pens. A Douglas DC-4 passenger airplane passes by the Empire State building, while in flight over Manhattan Island, New York City. Steamships in terminals on the Hudson River. Tug boats and barges in New York harbor. Ocean-going cargo ships pass by the Statue of Liberty. Vehicular traffic in the streets of Norfolk, Virginia. A sign reads 'US Naval Base, Norfolk, Virginia'. View of ships and harbor at Norfolk Naval Station. Headquarters of the Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic (SACLANT). NATO officers in the "great map room of SACLANT" at the Headquarters. World map placed on a wall. Scene from 1952: U.S. Navy Captain briefs Admiral Lynde D. McCormick, Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and also SACLANT. Map shows areas of SACLANT responsibility extending around the Atlantic from Southern Europe around past Iceland to the maritime provinces of Canada and down to the U.S. coast.. Surfaced submarine launches Regulus missile. Scene from 1960: U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) underway. Aircraft parked aboard the aircraft carrier. View of Naval Air Base at Oceana, Virginia. Douglas F4D flies above runway as another lands. Navy F8 aircraft parked on ramp. Canadian Naval Base at Halifax, Nova Scotia, with views of derricks, cranes, piers, and warships.

Date: 1960
Duration: 5 min 43 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
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