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New York United States USA 1934 stock footage and images

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A man and a woman talk in the light of a kerosene lamp in the United States. Also shows the 1893 DeWitt Clinton replica locomotive and train in operation.

The world struggle for oil is depicted. Use of components of oil in homes and in railroads in the United States is shown. A dramatization shows the effect of a kerosene lamp on social life. A woman seated in a chair near a table in a room. A kerosene lamp in a corner. A man opens the door of the room and walks in. The woman gets up and welcomes the man. They both walk to a seat and sit down. Another woman enters the room. The man stands to greet her. She increases the light of the lamp and then leaves the room. The man decreases the light of the lamp. The man and the woman talk. The 1893 replica of the 1831 DeWitt Clinton steam locomotive is shown in operation with its three carriage train, in New York City. The DeWitt Clinton was the first railroad locomotive to operate on the Mohawk & Hudson Railroad in New York. The reproduction seen here was built in 1893 by the New York Central Railroad for the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. This footage was shot on July 17, 1921 when the DeWitt Clinton train was preparing for a trip to another exposition in Chicago. On this day it ran several times from 96th to 116th streets in New York City. New York Central employees are seen on the drain, dressed as passengers would have been in 1831. This replica was later displayed at Grand Central Terminal in New York City, and is is now on display at The Henry Ford museum in Dearborn Michigan. It was acquired by Henry Ford in 1934, in an agreement with the New York Central that it would continue to travel to events on occasion.

Date: 1921, July 17
Duration: 2 min 50 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Vice President Nixon and Senator Kennedy debate in the United States over nuclear tests resumed by the Soviet Union.

The fourth presidential election debate held between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon in in New York, United States on 21st October 1960. NBC News correspondent John Chancellor asks a question to Senator Kennedy in relation with U.S. relations with the Soviet Union. Correspondent Chancellor asks if Russians have resumed testing of nuclear devices as per news from Atomic Energy Commission of Washington and if the U.S. would resume its own nuclear testing in 1961. Senator Kennedy replies to the question and says that the next President of the United States should make one last effort to secure an agreement on the cessation of nuclear tests. He mentions the Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments from 1932-1934 held in Geneva, Switzerland. Kennedy says that he believes the effort should be made once more by who so ever is elected the President of the United States. Senator Kennedy says that if they fail in making the effort, the responsibility will be clearly on the Russians and then they'll have to meet their responsibilities for the security of the United States, and they may have to test underground. He says that there may be testing in outer space. Senator Kennedy says that he is most concerned about the whole problem of the spread of atomic weapons. ABC News correspondent Quincy Howe asks the Vice President to comment. Vice President Nixon says that the Soviet Union is filibustering. He says further that the elected president should immediately make a time table to break Soviet filibustering.

Date: 1960
Duration: 3 min 47 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
 
Universal Pictures beats McPherson Globe Refiners in basketball to win Olympics final in New York City

A newsreel titled "Universal five wins Olympics basketball final" shows a game between the company team from Universal Pictures and the McPherson Globe Refiners from Globe Oil and Refining Co. of McPherson, Kansas. The McPherson team is sometimes also referred to as the Oilers, or the Refiners. The teams are seen playing in the Olympics Qualifying basketball final in New York's Madison Square Garden. People cheer the two teams. Universal defeats the McPherson Globe Refiners to win the Olympics final. The win entitled the Universal Pictures team to name 7 players to the Olympic basketball team representing the United States in the 1936 Olympics held in Berlin Germany, and McPherson Globe Refiners was able to name 6 players to the team. These two teams beat out five U.S. college teams to earn the spots in the final and determine the makeup of the U.S. Olympic Basketball team. Players in the game in this video clip include Globe Refiners forward Francis Johnson, Centers Willard Schmidt and Joe Fortenberry, and Universal forward Carl Knowles. Universal beat the Globe Refiners by a score of 44 to 43. According to a Time Magazine article of April 13, 1936, the Globe Oil & Refining team, "...have perfected a technique called dunking with which they score by jumping up above the basket, dropping the ball into it." This may be one of the earliest references to dunking, now a staple technique in basketball. The same Time article further stated of the Oilers, "On the defense, they prevent opponents from scoring by batting the ball out of the basket." Again, the Globe Refiners were demonstrating play that later became standard in modern basketball. The idea for the Globe Refiners was a company promotion scheme, thought up in 1934 by Gene Johnson, the Sales Manager of Globe Oil who had several years experience coaching basketball. The Olympic team also included Washington State Huskey player Ralph Bishop. The USA went on to win the gold, defeating Canada 19-8.

Date: 1936, April 6
Duration: 1 min 9 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Peacetime activities and contributions by the U.S. Army in the United States.

Scenes from Army Day on April 6, 1934. Secretary of War George Henry Dern, in broadcast to the nation about importance of the Army, in peacetime. Brief glimpses of the Yellowstone River lower falls and Old Faithful and Beehive geysers erupting in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. View amongst log buildings in Reproduction of Army Fort Dearborn, at the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago, Illinois. A pioneer wagon; Native American Indians in ceremonial regalia; antique locomotives and trains at the Exposition. Army General Leonard Wood being sworn in as the Governor General of the Philippines. Closeup of General of the Armies, John J. Pershing, America's highest ranking Military officer. Headquarters of Walter Reed Army hospital, in Washington, DC, named for U.S. Army Major Walter Reed, who confirmed that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquito. Acting on this, the U.S. was able to complete the Panama Canal. View of French dredging equipment sitting idle in the water after Yellow Fever prevented them from completing the canal. Closeup of U.S. Army General William C. Gorgas, who, in 1904, headed the Sanitary Department that controlled mosquitoes and eradicated Yellow Fever, so the canal could be finished. View of a cayman in swamp near the canal. Photograph of George Washington Goethals, Chief Engineer credited with making the canal happen. Explosives employed in canal construction. Earth and rocks being loaded into open rail cars. A steamship transiting the Panama Canal. The Washington Monument; U.S. Library of Congress; and the Lincoln Memorial, cited as examples of accomplishments by U.S. Army engineers. The Wilson Dam, under construction by Army engineers, in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and system of levees being built to control the Mississippi River. The raging Mississippi River during 1927 flood. Flood victims being assisted by U.S. Army soldiers, at a tent camp, receiving food and clothing. An Army airplane flying over a forest fire. Army personnel supervising men in the Civilian Conservation Corps or CCC. Mail being loaded aboard an Army airplane, as airmail service is being opened between Washington DC and New York City. President Woodrow Wilson talking with Army pilot Major Reuben H. Fleet. Mail being loaded into the nose of an airplane. U.S. Army Douglas World Cruiser airplanes in flight, returning from their trip around the world in 1924. A pilot sitting in front seat of a Douglas O-38 airplane, pulls a fabric hood over his cockpit to practice "blind flying". View of the aircraft in flight, with instructor pilot in the open rear cockpit. Army aviators taking a camera and a rifle aboard their airplane as they prepare to leave on an aerial mapping flight. Aerial view of skyscrapers of Manhattan Island, New York City. Army Signal Corps personnel working on communications devices. A cable laying ship operating at sea, in support of the U.S. Army's Alaskan cable and telegraph system. Men loading chemicals into hoppers on Army crop dusting airplane. Several views of Army airplanes crop dusting. Glimpse of boll weevil, the target of their efforts. Closeup of Karl Connell, who as a major in the AEF, in World War I, invented a superior gas mask known as the “Connell” or “Victory” mask. A group of miners wearing gas masks enter a smoky mine entrance. The Army invented tear gas, which is shown being used to thwart a bank robbery, in a staged demonstration. Brigadier General Hugh Johnson, appointed by President Franklin Roosevelt, as head of the Great Depression era National Recovery Administration, or NRA, is seen about to give a speech. Narrator cites him as an example of U.S. Army officers who also serve the country in civilian life. Scene shifts to cadets on parade at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York.

Date: 1934
Duration: 3 min 36 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Official of the Boys Clubs of America awards a Medal to J Edgar Hoover at a ceremony in the United States.

First Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of United States, John Edgar Hoover awarded a Medal in the United States. An official of the Boys Clubs of America addresses the attendees. He states that Hoover is only the second person to receive the Medal after John Hays Hammond in 1934. He talks about a poll at the New York Boys' Club that depicts Hoover as an inspiration to the youth. He reads out the citation and presents the medal to Hoover. Hoover accepts. The official displays the Medal.

Date: 1937
Duration: 3 min 2 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
 
Babe Ruth honored before his final baseball game with New York Yankees, 1934

Brief newsreel clip covering Babe Ruth's final game with the New York Yankees at Washington's Griffith Stadium, September 30, 1934. Players, photographers and dignitaries honor Ruth before the game with ceremony around home plate. Man presents Ruth, wearing Yankees road uniform, with an award. Ruth accept it and talks briefly, standing next to his wife Claire, seen at right. Brief shot of Washington Senators pitcher Orville Armburst throwing. (Armbrust would get the only win of his major league career in this game.) Ruth, pictured in a different game and in home uniform, steps into batter's box. Scene of Ruth hitting a home run from earlier in his career.

Date: 1934, September 30
Duration: 21 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
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