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Tallulah Louisinia 1925 stock footage and images

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Insecticide being loaded in a DH-4 and dusted over lakes and swamps in Tallulah, Louisinia to kill malaria mosquitoes.

Activities of the U.S. Army Air Service in Tallulah, Louisinia. Insecticide being loaded into a hooper on a modified DH-4 De Havilland. The DH-4 in flight over lakes and swamps. It dusts the insecticide to kill malaria mosquitoes.

Date: 1925
Duration: 2 min 12 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Dramatization: Samples of toxic compounds to be used for the eradication of Boll Weevils tested in United States.

Dramatization: Calcium arsenates spray to combat Boll Weevils in United States. Proctor, a farmer reads newspaper with his wife. He reads news about the eradication of Boll Weevils. He shows the news to his wife. He visits the laboratory. He discusses the matter with Mr Owens who is a Government expert and helps the farmers. Samples of calcium arsenate are examined at the Department of Agriculture laboratories in Tallulah, Los Angeles. The samples are then transferred to the laboratory of Washington DC. Men test the sample. Test tubes on tables. The matter discussed in the board room. Chairman says that the material is harmful for the use of farmers. The bad material is seized by the Department of Agriculture.

Date: 1921
Duration: 4 min 14 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Dramatization: Sample of calcium arsenate examined at the government laboratory in United States.

Dramatization: Calcium arsenates spray to combat Boll Weevils in United States. A man addresses the people about the correct use of poison at the Deer Park. He says that only calcium arsenate should be used for the purpose. A man picks some calcium arsenate from a barrel and shows it to people. Men stand near barrels full of calcium arsenate. He puts a sample in a box, wraps it and sends it for its examination to the Government laboratory in Tallulah, La. Chemist determines the composition and fluffiness of the sample. Test glass tubes on the table. The grains studied under microscope and the chemist reports the result showing the certificate.

Date: 1921
Duration: 2 min 45 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Busy city street with 1920's era automobiles; also Kerosene and by-products obtained from distillation of crude petroleum in US

Slate indicates that 200 million gallons of gasoline are used annually in the United States for power (in 1925). View of a busy city street, possibly New York City, circa 1925 with motor vehicle traffic, pedestrians and many tall buildings. Many early automobiles seen. A worker tests flash point of kerosene. Lighted candle in stuck block of paraffin (wax) showing wax or parrafin as a byproduct of petroleum. Slate indicates that petroleum provides motor fuel, common light, a lubricant for machinery and other important by-products.

Date: 1925
Duration: 1 min 8 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Lt. Williams puts on a parachute and climbs into the cockpit of a R3C1 and two R3C1 fly over Mitchel Field in New York.

Lieutenant Al Williams flying a Curtiss R3C1 racer aircraft for the 1925 Pulitzer Race at Mitchel Field in New York, United States. View of the navy R3C1. Lieutenant Al Williams and a civilian look at a map laid out on a wingtip of the aircraft. Lieutenant Cy Bettis and Lieutenant Williams standing behind the navy R3C1 aircraft. Lieutenant Williams removes his uniform coat and cap, then Lieutenant Bettis helps him put on a parachute and he climbs into the cockpit of the aircraft. Lieutenant Williams seated in the cockpit of the navy R3C1. He smiles at a camera and puts on goggles. A civilian comes up to side of the cockpit and the two men confer over a small notebook. The navy R3C1 with its engine running on a grass field. Several Curtiss mechanics push the tail of the aircraft around. An army officer, a civilian and an army enlisted man are standing nearby and are watching. The navy R3C1 taxis in front of a small hangar. The army R3C1 takes off. Two aircraft flying over Mitchel Field during the course of the 1925 Pulitzer Race. The navy R3C1 lands. Lt. Williams wearing a flight jacket and a navy service cap.

Date: 1923, August
Duration: 5 min 29 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Lieutenant Cyrus Bettis and Lieutenant Jimmy Doolittle win air races in 1925.

In October 1925, crowd gathered to watch the Pulitzer Trophy air races at Mitchel Field, Long Island, New York. VIPs arrive in various automobiles. Army Air Service Curtiss R3C-1 airplane is pushed onto the field. Air Service Chief, General Patrick , speaks with Lieutenant Cyrus Bettis as Lieutenant James Doolittle listens. A Navy crew works on their entry in the race, similar to the Army Air Service airplane. Navy Lieutenant Al Williams seen with a pipe upside down in his mouth. Lieutenant Bettis taxis out for takeoff in his airplane number 43. Then Navy Lt. Williams proceeds to take off in his aircraft, number 40. Lt. Bettis breaks ground and begins to fly the closed course, coming very close to the ground at times. He lands and climbs out of the cockpit, surrounded by spectators and officials who are convinced he has won, registering a speed of 249 miles per hour. Navy Lt. Williams lands shortly thereafter having averaged 242 miles per hour. He is greeted by several spectators, including a young woman. Two weeks later, the U.S. Army was represented by Lieutenant Jimmy Doolittle, who flew the Curtis R3C-1, again, but this time fitted with floats, at the Schneider Cup Seaplane Race in Baltimore, Maryland. He shakes hands with a young woman, just before the race. The Navy also entered with a similar seaplane, shown being pushed into the water. The British entry, a Glouster-Mapier IIIA is seen (replacing the Supermarine-Napier S.4, that was damaged). The Italian Macci M.33 is seen on a dock with engine running. The float planes taxi out over the Chesapeake bay waters to takeoff position. Doolittle is the first to take off and to return, logging an average speed of 232 miles per hour. He is seen smiling after the race.

Date: 1925, October
Duration: 2 min 13 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
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