Refine Your Search

Tanzania East Africa 1918 stock footage and images

- Showing 1 to 6 of 3271 results
 
British troops supervise building of bridge across the Wami River to facilitate transport of wounded to hospital in World War I

British officers supervising construction of a small wooden bridge over the Wami River in German East Africa (Tanzania). British Indian colonial soldiers assemble wood logs on support. British officer instructs them. Colonial soldiers carry a wounded soldier on a stretcher, across the new bridge.

Date: 1918
Duration: 30 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Charles Lindbergh takes off from Roosevelt Field for his famous solo flight from New York to Paris.

People gathered early on a misty morning at Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, to watch as Charles Lindbergh attempts to make a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in his airplane, The Spirit of St. Louis. The plane starts its takeoff role between groups of spectators, raising dust. The spectators move to get a better view as the plane continues, out of sight in the fog and mist. It is not clear where the plane is, although engine sound has changed. Spectators strain to see it through the mist. Then, some cheers are raised when the crowd realizes that Lindbergh has successfully taken off in his heavily laden airplane. The opening caption refers to Curtiss Field, where the Spirit of St. Louis was test flown and reportedly maintained in Hanger 16. there, from May 12th through the 20th. However, for the Paris flight, the plane was towed a mile to Roosevelt Field where, heavily loaded with fuel, it could take advantage of the longer runway for takeoff. (Note: Both fields were originally part of the old Hempstead Plains Field renamed Hazlehurst Field when taken over by the U.S. Army in 1917. U.S. Geological survey maps of 1918 show three areas named, respectively, Hazelhurst Aviation Field No. 1; Aviation Field No. 2; and Camp Albert L. Mills, abutting it. Field No. 2 was renamed Mitchel Field on July 16, 1918. The eastern part of Field No. 1 was dedicated as Roosevelt Field, on September 24, 1918. After the war, the western part of Field No. 1 became known as Curtiss Field, associated, as it was, with the Curtiss Aeroplane & Motor Company located there.)

Date: 1927, May 20
Duration: 2 min 4 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Vice President Nixon and Senator Kennedy debate over a fight against communism prior to presidential elections in the U.S.

The fourth presidential election debate held between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon in New York, United States on 21st October 1960. ABC News correspondent Quincy Howe speaks during the debate and allows correspondent Walter Cronkite to ask Senator Kennedy a question. Mr. Cronkite asks Senator Kennedy that in what areas the United States might take offensive against communism rather than being defensive to the Soviet Union. Senator Kennedy replies to the question and says that the eastern Europe is very vulnerable area according to him. He says there should be policies which make it possible to establish closer relation with a country like Poland and he also mentions the Hungarian Revolution. Senator Kennedy speaks about the relations between the Soviet Union and China. He says that India represents a great area for affirmative action by the free world. India started from about the same place that China did. India under a free society has been making some progress. But if India does not succeed, Communism can take over. He says that in Africa, Asia, Latin America, eastern Europe, the great force on their side is the desire of people to be free. Correspondent Howe asks Vice President Nixon to comment on the topic. Nixon speaks about Poland and says that Poland in not in a position to take any independent position under Soviet control. He talks about aids being sent to Poland from the U.S. and says that the U.S. can have more exchange with Poland or with any other Iron Curtain countries.

Date: 1960
Duration: 4 min 58 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
 
USS Tennessee sails under Brooklyn Bridge in June 1920. Also seen: December 1918 Naval Review and Presidential Yacht, Mayflower

U.S. battleship, USS Tennessee, sails up East River to Brooklyn Naval Yard. Next scene shows her heading back out to sea for maneuvers with a fleet in the Atlantic Ocean. in both, the Tennessee sails under the Brooklyn Bridge. Woolworth Building in Manhattan visible. A tugboat follows.View,upward, to roadbed of the Brooklyn Bridge, from vessel passing underneath. Crew members aboard the ship look at the skyline of New York City. A large boat filled with sightseers passes on the river. A group of U.S. Navy officers poses near a gun turret of the ship. A group of sailors sits under a three-gun turret aboard the ship. Commercial vessels moving in the river. Sailors at railing, look at skyline of Manhattan, New York City, as the ship passes on the East River. Ferry boats pass. View of the Statue of Liberty, in mist, framed above, by three of the Ship's 14 inch guns. Two Admirals and the USS Tennessee's officers, pose on deck, under two turrets with three 14 inch guns, in each. Sailors of the crew pose on deck of the battleship. A different time: December 25, 1918, Crewman in foul weather gear stands at railing of official Photographers boat, with battleships in background, during the great Naval review. A motor launch flying a two-star admiral's ensign, passes at high speed, with the Presidential Yacht, Mayflower, in background. The launch circles and reverses course.

Date: 1920, June
Duration: 3 min 34 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: None
 
 
A military leader reviews Blackshirt troops in eastern Africa during World War II.

Italian troops in eastern Africa during World War II. A military leader reviews Blackshirt troops at Aenara. Flags are waved. Conical huts in a village. People in the village. Children are playing. A visit to a village for colonial troops at Amba Galliano.

Date: 1940
Duration: 1 min 26 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: Italian
 
 
Eddie Rickenbacker, President of Eastern Airlines, hosts Cyrus R. Smith, President of American Airlines, after both airlines acquire DC-3 airplanes

Glimpse of U.S. Army gun crew operating a 3-inch M3 Anti Aircraft gun. Glimpse of 1st Lt Joseph H. Eastman and Captain Eddie Rickenbacker standing beside Rickenbacker's SPAD S.XIII #1 parked in front of a hangar at Foucaucourt Aerodrome, France, 1918. Sequence shifts to 1936, and office of Rickenbacker, now President of Eastern Airlines. A poster on the wall contains memorabilia from the 94th Aero Squadron, with which Rickenbacker flew in World War I. Camera pans over photographes bordering the poster. Next, Rickenbacker is seen conversing with his guest, Cyrus R. Smith, President of American Airlines, as they look at a picture of Rickenbacker and his Spad airplane, signed by numerous pilots who also served with the 94th Aero Squadron. A mounted model of a Douglas DC-3 airplane sits atop a table in the foreground. Rickenbacker and C.R. Smith, both hold onto the DC-3 airplane model as they shake hands. Closeup of the DC-3 model as Rickenbacker rotates it before the camera. (Note: Both Smith and Rickenbacker, presidents of their respective airlines, had mutual admiration for the Douglas DC-3 airliner. In 1934,Smith arranged to purchase 20 new DC-3 airplanes from the Douglas Aircraft Company. American's first DC-3 "Flagship Illinois," had its maiden flight on June 25, 1936. Eastern Airlines took delivery of its first DC-3 in December 1936.)

Date: 1936
Duration: 51 sec
Sound: No
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
<< Previous | Page:1 2 3 ... 546 | Next >>