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Tuscaloosa Alabama USA 1963 stock footage and images

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African Americans Hood and Malone admitted to Univ of Alabama after President Kennedy overrules Governor Wallace's opposition

Newsreel, "Negroes enrolled as Governor Yields." Tight security at the registrar office of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Governor George Wallace confronts a deputy U.S. attorney and doesn't allow admission to the University for two African American students. An officer arrives and talks to Governor Wallace about President Kennedy's integration orders. Governor Wallace bows to Presidential authority and walks out. Students James Hood and Vivian Malone enter the registrar office for registration at the University. United States President John F. Kennedy addresses the nation from White House in Washington DC, regarding civil rights, saying country is facing moral crisis.

Date: 1963, June 11
Duration: 2 min 33 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Accomplishments of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, and later challenges of the Civil Rights movement in America

Turn of the Century immigrants to the United States pose aboard ship. Some wear fez hats. View of clothing industry workers at sewing machines. Picture of Sidney Hillman and his wife, circa 1910. Older garment worker cutting cloth. Clothing workers punching a time clock. Men operating sewing machines. A cutter marking cloth from a pattern. A man sewing button holes on clothing. Old pictures of earlier garment workers. More modern view of unionized clothing workers at sewing machines. A cutter using a machine to cut multiple layers of fabric. Supervisors discussing a sample of sewn product. numerous views of men and women sewing garments. Flashback to earlier times of workers marching to demand a union contract. Union member distributing literature at a factory gate. Small group of union picketers on sidewalk. Union leader speaking to group of women workers in Southern town. Union organizer with bloodied head, smoking cigarette. Striking Workers (mostly women) standing in group outside employment office of Tuf-Nut Garment Manufacturing Company in Little Rock,Arkansas. The striking women being arrested by policemen. Change of scene to closeup of Alabama State policeman smoking cigar. Civil rights marchers during demonstration in Birmingham Alabama on May 7, 1963 during the "Birmingham Campaign" or "Birmingham Movement". Fire fighters in fire engine pumper truck stops near police on street in town and sets up fire hoses to spray high powered water directly at African American civil rights marchers. Civil Rights marchers soaked by high powered water hoses. One protestor or demonstrator tries to run away from the fire hose and is grabbed by two white police men. A protestor takes cover behind a telephone poll as a firehose is directed toward him. A black man converses with two women on a snowy street. Civil Rights marchers of the negro Southern Christian Leadership Conference carrying signs during a demonstration. People fill the area around the reflecting pool by the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. A man and his daughter share time together on a snowy day. Children sledding in the snow. People ice skating on lake in Central Park, New York City. Closing views of early immigrants to the U.S.A.

Date: 1964
Duration: 8 min 38 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
U.S. President Kennedy talks about equal rights for black and white citizens during a speech in Washington DC, United States.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy's speech regarding racism and racial tensions in Alabama, delivered from Washington DC, the White House. United States President Kennedy seated at a desk and speaks over a microphone. The President speaks about racial discrimination against blacks in the United States. He talks about the University of Alabama not giving admission to two clearly qualified young Alabama residents who happened to have been born Negroes, due to segregation and discrimination practices. View of people crowded outside the University of Alabama. Men take pictures as officials escort entering students Vivian Malone and James Hood into the University. The President says that the nation is founded on the principle that all men are created equal, and that the rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened. President Kennedy says that it is right for American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. Additional views of Vivian Malone and James Hood walking with crowds and also unaccompanied on the University of Alabama campus. A policeman rides a motorcycle on a road at the University. President Kennedy talks about respecting negro citizens and importance of civil rights and equality. The President says that no city or State or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore the rights of any of its citizens. Press record his speech and take pictures.

Date: 1963, June 11
Duration: 4 min 6 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Views of Martin Luther King Jr. and Kenneth Clarke on the position of African Americans in the US; Civil Rights protest scenes

James Baldwin speaks in United States. Scenes of strife and struggle during civil rights movement. Policemen beat a African American man. Doctor Kenneth Clark, Professor of Psychology at the City College of New York; Director of Fallen Youth Opportunities Unlimited and Research Director, North Pride Center for Interpretation, sits in a chair during an interview. He speaks on the position of negroes and America's Promise. Other scenes: Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a small gathering of African Americans. They are standing in a house with fallen roof. He speaks about what happened there alluding that they know the truth of the racist hate crime. He speaks about remaining strong in striving for freedom for negro citizens. People around him sing and clap. Martin Luther King Jr. looks into a bible. Ebenezer Baptist Church and its interiors are seen, where Martin Luther King Jr. preaches. Exterior view of a Woolworths store where African Americans in protest sit at a segregated lunch counter at Woolworth store and wait to be served, in a non-violent demonstration. People pass through doors. Men moving on a road are stopped by a policeman. He stands with other policemen. The civil rights demonstrators stop and pray together. They are then directed to a waiting police paddy wagon van for arrest. Policeman hits a African American man. African Americans are put in police paddy wagons. Policemen detain African American demonstrators during a march and use dogs in rounding up demonstrators. Fire truck arrives during a protest and firemen spray firehoses at African American demonstrators on May 7, 1963 in Birmingham Alabama during the Birmingham Campaign or movement. High powered fire hoses spraying water at demonstrators. Police chasing and detaining demonstrators in a crowd during a black civil rights demonstration.

Date: 1963
Duration: 10 min 25 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Various Buildings, Monuments and Landmarks of United States.

Views of various projects depicting man's creative engineering skills across the United States, including: The Indian Serpent Mounts, Ohio; Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Headquarters, Connecticut; Mackinac Bridge, Michigan; Green Bank Radio Astronomy Antenna, West Virginia; Tanker "Manhattan" in the Northwest Passage; Chicago's Marina Towers, Illinois; NASA launch complex 39, Florida with a rocket in place; Watts tower, California; John Hancock Building, Illinois; Washington Monument; Dworshak Dam while under construction, Idaho; Newport Bridge, Rhode Island; U.S. Steel building, Pennsylvania; Mt. Glory Arch Bridge under construction in Wyoming; Johnson Wax Headquarters building, Wisconsin; Boeing 747 Factory Building Complex, Seattle Washington; A model of the proposed New Orleans Super Dome in Louisiana; Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel; Dulles International Airport, Virginia; Tyrone Guthrie Theatre, Minnesota; Westinghouse Headquarters building, Pennsylvania; Rio Grande Gorge Bridge, New Mexico; Gulf Life Tower, Florida; Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, Wisconsin; a paddle style River boat on the Ohio River; an artist depiction of the under construction Mobile River Highway Tunnel, Alabama; the Westinghouse Desalinization Plant, Florida; Model of master plan for the city of Gary, Indiana; Gulf Oil's "Big Brutus" crane at work on a dig site (The 160-foot tall coal shovel known as the 1850-B was designed and built by Bucyrus-Erie in Hallowell Kansas, for the Pittsburg & Midway, or P&M Coal Mining Company. It is the only one of its kind ever built. The mining company was purchased by Gulf Oil in 1963, and subsequently went under The Chevron Mining umbrella); Knights of Columbus headquarters building, Connecticut.

Date: 1970
Duration: 2 min 29 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Color
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
U.S. President Kennedy talks about respecting Negroes and giving them equal rights during a speech on Alabama in Washington DC.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy's speech on Alabama in Washington DC. The White House. United States President John Kennedy seated at a desk and speaks over a microphone. The President speaks about the discrimination of blacks by whites in the United States. He talks about the University of Alabama not giving admission to two clearly qualified young Alabama residents (James Hood and Vivian Malone) who happened to have been born Negroes. President Kennedy says that the nation is founded on the principle that all men are created equal, and that the rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened. The President says that it is possible for the American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. President Kennedy talks about respecting Negroes and all Americans and urges people not to discriminate and to uphold civil rights. He says that no city or State or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore them.

Date: 1963, June 11
Duration: 4 min 6 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
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