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New York United States USA 1960 stock footage and images

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U.S. Vice President Nixon talks about the foreign policy of America prior to presidential elections in the United States.

The fourth presidential election debate between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon on 21st October 1960 in in New York, United States. News correspondent Quincy Howe speaks prior to the fourth Kennedy-Nixon presidential debate. Mr. Howe reads out the rules and conditions under which the candidates will proceed. He says that Senator Kennedy will make the second opening statement and the first closing statement. Vice President Nixon speaks about the present issue in the United States which is keeping peace without surrender. The peace which is threatened by international communist movements. Nixon says that the United States has to learn from mistakes made in past. He relates to this by mentioning the period of the Iron Curtain in Europe and during the Korean War. Nixon says that situation in President Dwight Eisenhower's administration is reversed. He says that the United States made errors in the past in misjudging the Communists, applying same rules of conduct that are applied to the leaders of the free world. Nixon mentions East-West Paris summit conference of 1960 and Eisenhower's policy regarding Formosa Straits. Nixon speaks that that United States should increase its military strength to high level regardless of what potential opponents have and if any surprise attack is launched, the United States can destroy their war-making capacity. Nixon further says that American policies of military strength, economic strength, and diplomatic firmness will keep the peace without surrender.

Date: 1960
Duration: 9 min 54 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
1960 Presidential Election news headquarters operations; results show John F. Kennedy leading over Richard Nixon

The 1960 Presidential Election in the United States. Interiors of a building show NBC News and CBS News Election Tracking headquarters operations. Board tracking the election result returns. A man behind a camera. Many news employees inside the building. The men preparing to broadcast the results of the elections. Interiors of a television network headquarters shows men and women at tabulating machines and electronic computers. A huge crowd gathered at the Republican Party headquarters. A few men and women beside a tally board updating election results. People in the crowd looking at a board. The board showing Presidential candidates Richard Nixon's and John F. Kennedy's count of votes in states Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota and several other states. A woman in the crowd looking through binoculars. The figures show Kennedy leading. The moving ticker bulletin board in Times Square, New York City, is shown reading "Kennedy Overcomes Slow Start, Pulls ahead of Nixon" as the counting continues. The Times Square moving bulletin reads 'Kennedy wins Connecticut's 8 Electoral votes, Sweeps all'. A crowd cheering and shouting 'We Want Kennedy'. The bulletin reading 'Kennedy leads in 17 states with 192 electoral votes'. A CBS news worker beside a map showing the states and the position of Republican and Democratic candidates in each state. A bulletin reading 'Kennedy stage see-saw battle in Virginia'. Men inside the television network headquarters. Close up view of a camera being used to film the television news broadcast. A board showing position of the candidates in the election.

Date: 1960
Duration: 2 min 46 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Candidates Nixon and Kennedy debate over prestige of the U.S. overseas prior to the presidential elections in the U.S.

The fourth presidential election debate held between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon in New York, United States on 21st October 1960. ABC News correspondent Quincy Howe allows CBS News correspondent Walter Cronkite to ask a question to Vice President Nixon. Mr. Cronkite asks Vice President Nixon if the Eisenhower Administration was suppressing a report by the United States Information Agency that shows a decline in United States prestige overseas as pointed by Senator Kennedy. Vice President Nixon replies and talks about Sputnik Program launched by the Soviet Union. He further compares the United States and the Soviet Union in terms of education and science. He speaks about UN General Assembly votes called on the Soviet Union to end its Hungarian intervention in 1956 and relates to American prestige. Senator Kennedy says that he did not make most of the statements that Vice President Nixon said he has made and he refers to the first one about Sputnik Program launched by the Soviet Union. Senator Kennedy refers to slums in the United States and talks about support housing legislation which the Eisenhower's Administration has opposed and also speaks about scientists and engineers United States has produced in comparison to the Soviet Union. He further says they were the first in other areas of science but in space, which is the new science, they are not the first

Date: 1960
Duration: 4 min 55 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
 
Vice President Nixon talks about Communist influence in the Western Hemisphere prior to presidential elections in the U.S.

The fourth presidential election debate held between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon in New York, United States on 21st October 1960. ABC news correspondent Quincy Howe speaks during the fourth Kennedy-Nixon presidential debate. He speaks that the candidates would answer and comment upon questions put by these four correspondents: Frank Singiser of Mutual News, John Edwards of ABC News, Walter Cronkite of CBS News and John Chancellor of NBC News. Frank Singiser puts the first question to Vice President Nixon. He asks Nixon the way he would handle Fidel Castro's regime and prevent establishment of Communist governments in the Western Hemisphere and why his policy is better for peace and security of the United States in the Western Hemisphere. Nixon answers that Senator Kennedy's policies and recommendations for the handling of Castro regime are dangerously irresponsible recommendations that he's made during the course of this campaign. Nixon speaks that what Senator Kennedy recommends is that the U.S. government should give help to exiles and to those within Cuba who oppose Castro regime, provided they are anti-Batista. Nixon says the United States have five treaties with Latin America, including the one setting up the Organization of American States in Bogota in 1948, in which the U.S. has agreed not to intervene in the internal affairs of any other American country. He further says that if the U.S. follows recommendations of Senator Kennedy then the country would probably be condemned in the United Nations and it would result in an open invitation to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to come into Latin America and to engage the U.S. in a civil war. He speaks about quarantining Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro by cutting off trade and diplomatic relations with Cuba.

Date: 1960
Duration: 5 min 16 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
 
Divers at the 1960 Aquarama in New York, United States.

Aquarama 1960 at the World's Fair Grounds in New York, United States. Diver champions follow a precision routine as they dive into the pool making beautiful formations at the Aquarama 1960. A comedy routine featuring Sid Kenaly shows the manner in which one should not dive.

Date: 1960, August 1
Duration: 59 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Edited
Language: English
 
 
Vice President Nixon and Senator Kennedy debate in the United States over nuclear tests resumed by the Soviet Union.

The fourth presidential election debate held between Democratic nominee Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican nominee U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon in in New York, United States on 21st October 1960. NBC News correspondent John Chancellor asks a question to Senator Kennedy in relation with U.S. relations with the Soviet Union. Correspondent Chancellor asks if Russians have resumed testing of nuclear devices as per news from Atomic Energy Commission of Washington and if the U.S. would resume its own nuclear testing in 1961. Senator Kennedy replies to the question and says that the next President of the United States should make one last effort to secure an agreement on the cessation of nuclear tests. He mentions the Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments from 1932-1934 held in Geneva, Switzerland. Kennedy says that he believes the effort should be made once more by who so ever is elected the President of the United States. Senator Kennedy says that if they fail in making the effort, the responsibility will be clearly on the Russians and then they'll have to meet their responsibilities for the security of the United States, and they may have to test underground. He says that there may be testing in outer space. Senator Kennedy says that he is most concerned about the whole problem of the spread of atomic weapons. ABC News correspondent Quincy Howe asks the Vice President to comment. Vice President Nixon says that the Soviet Union is filibustering. He says further that the elected president should immediately make a time table to break Soviet filibustering.

Date: 1960
Duration: 3 min 47 sec
Sound: Yes
Color: Monochrome
Clip Type: Unedited
Language: English
 
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